Aircraft Maximum Wind Limits

What are the maximum wind limits for a commercial jet aircraft?

How much wind is too much wind to land or take-off?

What’s the strongest wind passenger jets can fly in?

There is no single maximum wind limit as it depends on the direction of wind and phase of flight. A crosswind above about 40mph and tailwind above 10mph can start to cause problems and stop commercial jets taking off and landing.

It can sometimes be too windy to take-off or land. The limitations are in place for the safety of the passengers and crew.

Aircraft & Wind – An Overview

In aviation, speed is measured in Knots (Nautical Miles Per Hour). This is converted to Miles Per Hour (mph) by multiplying it by 1.15.

The maximum wind limits for commercial aircraft depend on the aircraft, airport and the direction of the wind compared to the direction of the take-off or landing.

For take-off and landing, aircraft have different limitations, and these are again split up into dry, wet or contaminated runway limitations. A contaminated runway is where is there is snow, ice or standing water on the runway.

Aircraft maximum wind limits are split up into:

  • Crosswind component – the side element of the wind
  • Headwind – amount of wind from the front of the aircraft
  • Tailwind – amount of wind from behind the aircraft
  • Total wind – total speed of the wind

Aircraft want to take off and land into a headwind as this reduces the distance they require to get airborne or distance need to bring the aircraft to a stop. If an aircraft is standing still on the runway, and has a headwind component of 20kts, that’s 20kts of air flowing over the wing and therefore giving the aircraft an airspeed of 20kts, even though it’s not moving. If it has a take-off speed of 140kts, the aircraft’s ground speed would only need to be 120kts to get airborne because it already has 20kts of airspeed from the wind.

General Limitations

In general, commercial aircraft demonstrate a capability to land with a certain crosswind at the aircraft certification stage. This demonstrated limit is not a maximum limit, but is the figure that most operators (airlines) will choose to use as a limit – it’s not sensible to have an uncapped figure. Therefore, the figures provided below for the B737-800 are typical of those dictated by an operator, not the manufacture.

Take-off Limitations

On a dry runway, a Boeing 737-800 has a maximum allowable crosswind component of approximately 33kts. For taking off on a wet runway it’s about 27kts. The actual figure might be slightly above or below this because the airline can choose to set its own more restrictive value if it wishes. If the cross-wind component was greater than this, the aircraft might have an option to choose another runway which is more into wind, but in the case of a single runway airport, it wouldn’t be able to depart.

There is no headwind limitation for most commercial aircraft for take-off, and therefore is no maximum overall limit for take-off (or landing). If there was a 100mph wind, all of which was a headwind component, in theory the aircraft wouldn’t be restricted from taking off. However, the reality is that there are wind limits for opening and closing the aircraft doors (around 45kts) and no pilots would attempt to taxi and depart in such conditions. The airport would have closed in such circumstances anyway!

Tailwind vs Heading

The maximum allowable tailwind value is usually between 10-15kts. Tailwinds are easy to avoid at most airports, as if you simply take off in the other direction, the headwind has now become a tailwind. Tailwind has the opposite effects of a headwind, increasing the runway distance needed to take off and land.

However, at some airfields, it’s actually better to accept a tailwind on one runway rather than a headwind on another because of potential terrain issues. A good example for this is Florence (FLR). It’s actually better to accept a bit of a tailwind on runway 23 than a headwind on RWY 05 because of the very large hill/mountain in very close proximity to RWY05. If you were to lose an engine, you must still be able to meet a climb gradient guaranteed to get you above the terrain on RWY 05, which can mean you are very weight limited even with a headwind. You can actually increase your maximum take-off weight even by accepting a tailwind on RWY 23.

Landing

On a dry runway, the Boeing 737-800 crosswind limitation is the same as take-off, 33kts. On a wet runway this reduces to a maximum of 30kts.

The maximum tailwind component for take-off and landing is usually between 10-15kts, but the actual figure that can be used may be performance limited by runway length, aircraft weight etc.

In the event of a contaminated runway, both the maximum allowable crosswind / tailwind limits reduce, depending on the type and depth of the contaminant. Most airlines do not allow a tailwind take-off on a contaminated runway.

Taxi Limits

Some aircraft specify maximum taxi limits. For example, on the Boeing 737, the maximum taxi speed is 65kts.

Door Limits

There are limits on when the cargo and passenger doors can be opened. If the wind is more than about 45kts, it isn’t deemed safe to open the doors.

Other things that affect the maximum allowable wind:

  • The airline might impose tighter restrictions than the manufacture. Therefore, a Boeing 737-800 airline might have different limits to another airline operating the same aircraft.
  • Pilots have different limits. Captains can usually operate the aircraft up to the maximum specified limits but Senior and Junior First Officers will have more restrictive limits. The Captain will do the landing if it exceeds their limits.
  • Some airports impose restrictions on wind limits. For example, at London City Airport, the maximum cross wind limit is 25kts, whereas some of the aircraft operating into there have a 38kts dry runway limit for take-off and landing. This is because it’s narrower and shorter than other airports.
  • Aircraft design. An aircraft with a big vertical stabiliser (the big fin at the tail) is going to be more effected by a crosswind than one with a smaller one. An aircraft with winglets is also more likely to be affected by crosswind.

Airfield

The airport itself may limit the maximum allowable wind limits. For example, at London City Airport (LCY), the maximum crosswind limit is 25kts for all aircraft because the runway is only 30m wide (compared to a standard width of 45m or sometimes even 60m at larger airfields).

Aircraft Type & Aerodynamics

The maximum wind limits between aircraft differ because of aerodynamic and handling differences. Generally speaking the larger the vertical stabiliser compared to the rest of the aircraft, the more the plane will be affected by a crosswind. Larger aircraft counteract this by having larger control surfaces therefore giving the pilots greater control authority. If you take the Boeing 777 for example, it’s crosswind limit for landing on a dry runway is 40kts – more than a Boeing 737.

Some of the same aircraft types even differ because of their configuration. For example, a standard A320 has a higher crosswind limit than an A320 with Sharklets (Airbus’s version of winglets), as the Sharklets are an additional vertical surface for the wind to act upon.

Is Turbulence Dangerous?

How Dangerous is Turbulence?

What is turbulence and is it dangerous for passenger aircraft?

How Dangerous is Turbulence for Passenger Jets?

Turbulence can be dangerous if you are not seated with your seatbelt fastened as in very severe cases it can it can cause you to be thrown around the aircraft cabin resulting in injury. However, turbulence does not pose a danger to the structural integrity of the aircraft – the plane will keep flying even in severe turbulence.

Turbulence is probably the single most common cause of anxiety for airline passengers, yet it rarely causes the pilots any concerns about the safety of the aircraft. Turbulence is very common and is usually experienced to some degree every single flight. In all but the most extreme cases, turbulence is not a danger to the safety of the flight, rather more of an uncomfortable inconvenience. In essence, turbulence is annoying but rarely dangerous and your plane won’t crash because of it.

The best way to see how bad the turbulence is expected to be is to watch the Cabin Crew. If they have stopped the service and taken their seats, you know it’s about to get pretty bumpy!

What is Turbulence?

Turbulence is a bit like driving down a bumpy road in a car, except in this case it’s the air in the sky that’s a bit bump and rough. There are a number of different types of turbulence, some of which can be detected by most commercial aircraft, whilst other types are invisible and very difficult to predict.

Types of Turbulence


Convective Turbulence

Convection is the process which causes clouds to form and is can also be responsible for creating turbulence associated with the clouds, particularly cumulus types. The greater the vertical extent of the cloud, the greater the updrafts and therefore the worse the turbulence is likely to be. It is particularly bad when flying through Cumulonimbus clouds (which are associated with very heavy rain showers / hail or thunderstorms).

Clear Air Turbulence

Clear Air Turbulence (nicknamed CAT) is caused by jet streams which are very strong corridors of wind found at high altitudes. They can reach in excess of 150mph and whilst this can dramatically reduce the flight time if the wind is behind you, they can also be responsible for strong levels of turbulence.

Jet Streams form between the boundaries of warm and cold air and therefore vary in position throughout the year. Whilst the position of the jet stream isn’t difficult to predict, the turbulence associated with it is very difficult to accurately pin point.

Low Level Thermals

This is hot air rising from the ground which is prevellent on hot days at low altitudes, particuarly when over land. They are worst when the ground is at its hottest, so typically in the afternoon.

Wake Turbulence

Unlike the other types of turbulence mentioned so far which are weather related, wake turbulence is phenomenon caused by other aircraft.

It is caused by the aerodynamic effects of flight through the interaction between low pressure at the top of the wing and high pressure at the bottom (needed to produce lift). The air moves from the bottom to the top of the wing at the wing tip which causes wing tip vortices. If you fly through another aircraft’s wake, you might experience turbulence from it.

Wake turbulence occurs for a few seconds and it can be very violent. Air traffic control apply minimum spacing between aircraft to ensure adequate wake turbulence separation. Very strong wake turbulence has caused aircraft to crash in the past – hence there is now minimum distance or time separation between aircraft.
When its windy, the wake turbulence disappears quickly, however when it’s calm, the wake lingers around for longer.

Wind

Generally speaking, when closer to the ground, the wind is subject to friction and its flow is effected by the Earth’s surface and anything on it (like buildings etc). Therefore, near the ground, the wind is less laminar (straight and steady) and more turbulent (varying in direction and speed). Rapid variations in direction and speed can cause turbulence at low level, particularly when the aircraft is on final approach coming into land.

Can Pilots Detect Turbulence?

Pilots can detect certain types of turbulence using an onboard weather radar. The radar highlights where there are large quantities of water droplets (rain) on the pilot’s instruments. Generally speaking the bigger the rain drops, the bigger the cloud, and the more turbulent it will be inside that cloud. The pilots make a judgement on if they can fly through the cloud or avoid it by flying around it.

Can Pilots Avoid Turbulence?

Sometimes. There are some types of turbulence which can’t be detected, like Clear Air Turbulence or CAT which is associated with a Jet Steam. Sometimes it’s forecast and the pilots can do their best to avoid it by avoiding certain flight levels, but sometimes the forecasts are wrong and the pilots fly into it without knowing it’s there. That’s why they ALWAYS recommend that passengers keep their seat belts fastened whenever seated, regardless of the status of the fasten belt sign.

Prior and during flight, the pilots will be studying various weather charts which predict where any areas of Clear Air Turbulence is located, or where any thunderstorm (cumulonimbus) clouds mights occur during the flight. It provides the flight crew with a rough location and the altitudes that turbulence may be encountered. The pilots can then take action at the pre-flight planning stage to adjust the planned flight level or routing of the flight if required.

The pilots will often put the fasten seatbelt signs on prior to experiencing any turbulence based on the forecast or following communication with ATC or other aircraft.

Pilot Actions

Passenger comfort is a high priority for pilots so when the aircraft enters turbulence they are almost always doing their best to get out of it. This is not because it’s dangerous, but because it’s uncomfortable for both the passengers and crew. The pilots don’t like it any more than you do. To get out of it, pilots are regularly speaking to air traffic control and other aircraft to see what levels are free of turbulence or where along the route it might subside.

Unfortunately on some days, turbulence is prevalent at all levels and is impossible to avoid. In extremely rare cases where there is severe to extremely turbulence, the pilots may decide to divert the aircraft and land, but this is very, very rare.

On most occasions, what the general public would consider to be severe turbulence, is rarely more than moderate from the pilots point of view.

Turbulence Categorisation

Turbulence is categorised into Light, Moderate and Severe. The official definitions from IATA are as follows:

Light Turbulence:

Slight, erratic changes in altitude and/or attitude (pitch, roll, yaw).

  • Liquids are shaking but not splashing out of cups
  • Carts can be maneuvered with little difficulty
  • Passengers may feel a light strain against seat belts

Moderate Turbulence: 

Changes is altitude and/or attitude occur but with more intensity than light turbulence. Aircraft remains in control at all times.

  •   Liquids are splashing out of cups
  • Difficulties to walk or stand without balancing or holding on to something. Carts are difficult to maneuver
  • Passengers feel definite strain against seat belt

Severe Turbulence:

Large, abrupt changes in altitude and/or attitude. Usually causes large variations in airspeed.

    •   Items are falling over unsecured objects are tossed about.
    • Walking is impossible
    • Passengers are forced violently against seat belts

Are Thunderstorms Dangerous To Aircraft?

Are Thunderstorms Dangerous For Commercial Passenger Aircraft?

A look at how dangerous thunderstorms are for passenger jets

Can Thunderstorms Be Dangerous to Passenger Jets?

Yes, they can be dangerous to commercial aircraft as they can contain hail, heavy rain, lightning, ice, severe winds and super cooled water droplets, all of which may cause damage to the aircraft in extreme conditions. Pilots therefore do their very best to avoid flying through thunderstorms wherever possible.

What’s in a Thunderstorm?

Thunderstorms (Cumulonimbus clouds or ‘CBs’ as pilots refer to them) contain lightning, precipitation, hail, extreme turbulence, supercooled water droplets, ice, microbursts and violent winds, all of which can be hazardous to commercial passenger jets. They have caused passenger jets to crash before, and could possibly be a contributory part in a crash in the future.

Lightning

Commercial aircraft usually get struck by lightning a few times a year. The damage the aircraft receives from a lightning strike varies. The structure of the aircraft is designed to dissipate the electric charge overboard, but the entry and exit points can cause damage to the aircraft’s skin. It can also potentially interfere with the aircraft’s electrical systems but it rarely causes any significant problems.

Icing

Severe icing is dangerous for commercial aircraft. Ice forming on the aircraft structure increase the weight of the aircraft, which in turn increases the stalling speed. It also disrupts the airflow over the wings, reducing the total lift produced by the wings. Lift created by the wings counteracts the weight of the aircraft which is what gets, and keeps the aircraft airborne. Most commercial aircraft are certified to fly through light to moderate icing but not severe icing. Pilots will therefore always look to avoid areas of severe icing. Thunderstorms can be particuarly dangerous as they may contain ‘Super Cooled Waterdroplets’. This is liquid which remains as a fluid despite it being below the freezing temperature. It freezes as soon as it comes into contact with a hard surface, like an aircraft, which can cause significant performance issues.

Hail

Large hail stones found within large thunderstorms cells can cause structural damage to the aircraft and its engines. They have been known to cause damage to the leading edge of the wings and nose cone as well as crack the windshield and damage the engines.

Updrafts / Downdrafts (Wind Shear)

These can disrupt the aircrafts flight path and airspeed, potentially causing the aircraft to overspeed (go to fast) or stall (go to slowly). It can also push the aircraft towards the ground .

Microbursts

A Microburst is a phenomenon found underneath a Cumulonimbus cloud, where a strong downdraft causes a large change in wind direction over a small area. An aircraft flying through a microburst will likely see a large increase in airspeed followed by a dramatic reduction. If the aircraft is close to its landing speed at this point, it’s flying close to its stalling speed. A sudden and dramatic reduction in airspeed is very dangerous to any aircraft.

Microbursts also have the potential to cause significant downdrafts which ‘push’ the aircraft towards the ground. In extreme circumstances, the force at which the aircraft is pushed downwards is more than the thrust force produced by the engines and the rate of descent can’t be arrested.

If you found this article interesting, you might find our page on ‘Can pilots detect thunderstorms?‘ to be worth a read.

Can Pilots Detect Thunderstorms?

Can pilots detect thunderstorms on a commercial aircraft?

A look at the weather radar capabilities on a commercial jet…

Can passenger jets detect thunderstorms?

Yes they can. Commercial Aircraft have weather radars onboard which allows the pilots to measure the size of the water particles in a cloud which in turn allows the flight crew to make an assessment on the type of cloud it is (i.e. a thunderstorm) and whether to avoid it or not. The radar returns are imposed on a map, with varying colours which signify the size of the water droplets.

A cloud with large water droplets signifies that there are large vertical updrafts associated with it, which is a sign that the cloud could be a Cumulonimbus which is potentially hazardous to aviation.

Pilots do their best to avoid thunderstorms as they can be dangerous to passenger jets.

How the weather radar works

A weather radar uses a doppler system, which sends out a beam which is reflected by the water particles. The level of reflection depends on the size of the water droplets.

Pilots should have a good idea before the flight weather they should be on the look out for adverse weather such as thunderstorms. In the preflight briefing stage, the flight crew look through the flight paperwork, which includes weather reports for the departure, destination and en-route phases of flight. One or more diversion (alternate) airfields are also looked at, ensuring the weather at these airports is suitable to land it should the aircraft not be able to land at it’s scheduled destination.

Pilots will actively avoid taking the aircraft into Cumulonimbus type clouds as they can be hazardous to aviation. They can be very turbulent due to the updrafts and downdrafts, contain icing, heavy rain and hail and lightning.

Generally speaking, it’s best not to overly a Cumulonimbus cloud, as it can be in the formation stage where it can potentially out climb an aircraft. They can extend to over 50,000ft over the Equator where troposphere is at its highest.